Saturday, 26 May 2012

eXclamation!

Some of the days that go by should have exclamation marks after them.
Yesterday had photorealistic houses but painted flames coming from
the roofs. I saw it from up on the hill!


















story: Stanley Donwood; ill: nataliandwarnings

Sunday, 13 May 2012

cryingminotaur&hismaster




There's just the muffled crunchy sound of teeth grinding and scraping of boots on tarmac or something and a noise far away that maybe is someone crying or a cat and everything moves a bit in the wind but there isn't any noise of that sort of thing. There's a tape on of people talking about probably nothing important at a restaurant and a marching sound that's a bit like a lot of soldiers and a bit like a wheel rubbing against metal but it might not be a tape it's hard to tell. And everyone's run out of jokes because no-ones laughing at anything although they probably would if they had a sense of humour. Probably nothing important. Just a noise in the dark when youre half asleep something behind the curtains don't look its nothing don't look honestly its nothing. Maybe it's the town you live in making these noises or maybe it's you. Just a million mobiles and modems squawking and spluttering and hissing like piss on a fire like a million gallons of piss on an inferno just think of that eh? 
Just think of that. Vertebrae being sawn apart sounds like this.

And when I opened the curtains they were taking the set away and packing up for the day, the cameras and lights turned off. The darkness replaced with striplights and and the grey skies the blind whirring of machinery.
I'd like to write a beautiful story about love:
There's just the muffled crunchy sound of teeth grinding and scraping of boots on tarmac or something and a noise far away that maybe is someone crying or a cat and everything moves a bit in the wind but there isn't any noise of that sort of thing. There's a tape on of people talking about probably nothing important at a restaurant and a marching sound that's a bit like a lot of soldiers and a bit like a wheel rubbing against metal but it might not be a tape it's hard to tell. And everyone's run out of jokes because no-ones laughing at anything although they probably would if they had a sense of humour. Probably nothing important. Just a noise in the dark when youre half asleep something behind the curtains don't look its nothing don't look honestly its nothing. Maybe it's the town you live in making these noises or maybe it's you. Just a million mobiles and modems squawking and spluttering and hissing like piss on a fire like a million gallons of piss on an inferno just think of that eh? 
Just think of that. Vertebrae being sawn apart sounds like this.
And when I opened the curtains they were taking the set away and packing up for the day, the cameras and lights turned off. The darkness replaced with striplights and and the grey skies the blind whirring of machinery.
I'd like to write a beautiful story about love:
And when I opened the curtains they were taking the set away and packing up for the day, the cameras and lights turned off. The darkness replaced with striplights and and the grey skies the blind whirring of machinery.
I'd like to write a beautiful story about love:

(story: Stanley Donwood; Illustration: nataliandwarnings)


info@subliminalprojects.com


Opening tomorrow at Subliminal Projects in Los Angeles is a new show by Stanley Donwood, which features an 18-foot apocalyptic panorama of the City of Angels being destroyed by fire, flood and meteor storm...
The work was originally carved into 18 separate panels of linoleum, then hand burnished onto Japanese Kozo paper to create the epic print. Shown here is an extract from the piece, above, plus other works from the Lost Angeles series that also form part of the exhibition.

Subliminal Projects- Stanley


LOST ANGELES: NOW SHOWING

The exhibition Lost Angeles is now up at Subliminal Projects, Shepard Fairey's space on Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles. The show includes all of the new work created for this event as well as many now very rare prints from the London Views series. The opening nights (there were two; one secret, one not) were extremely well attended, so many thanks to everyone who came along.
I now have in my possession many photographs of the installed show, taken by Alan Shaffer, some of which are shown below.



Here is the custom-built curved wall, with the eighteen-foot-long kozo print of the entire work, suspended and affixed to the wall by the power of magnetism. The print is unframed; visitors may see the mulberry bark fibres in the paper and marvel at the hand-burnishing skills of Mr Grimmer (see earlier entries in this blog).



Here's the first room, with Tremendous Meteorite and the first nine individual linocut prints, and below are the second nine.



Below are three of the screenprints; Hollywood Dooom, Anaheim Anguish and Citybank Escapee. Through the entranceway is Apocalypse 101.





Above are four of the screenprints I did for London Views, now very rare. In fact, there was another one, called Gherkin, which is so rare even I don't have one; hence its omission from this exhibition.



And here is the giant black Diamond Heist Bear, created uaing black gloss perspex and black diamond dust. Almost impossible to photograph, this image leers over the exhibition like some sort of malevolent goblin.
A full list, with images and prices of works is available at SUBLIMINAL PROJECTS. Click through.

- 6th May 2012 

www.slowlydownward.com

Saturday, 12 May 2012





























up is down


 xurbia xendless






minotaurs and stuff...

One of the most famous stories from the Greek mythology, Theseus and the Minotaur hides a beautiful symbolism that provides deep philosophical lessons.
In ancient times, myths were much more than simple tales. By listening to stories of heroes, monsters and fantastic creatures, people internalized philosophical lessons and solutions for the problems that every human being faces in life.
Although it's true that some myths which were believed to be legends ended up being confirmed as a historical fact, such as the city of Troy, the most important about the myths is that they represent a psychological reality.
No matter whether the facts depicted in the myths were real or not, the message they pass on is always valid, as they represent the human nature and all the obstacles involved in the fascinating art of living.






 Min·o·taur 
n. Greek Mythology
A monster who was half man and half bull, to whom young Athenian men and women were sacrificed in the Cretan labyrinth until Theseus killed him.

Minotaur [ˈmaɪnətɔː]
n
(Myth & Legend / Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a monster with the head of a bull and the body of a man. It was kept in the Labyrinth in Crete, feeding on human flesh, until destroyed by Theseus
[via Latin from Greek Minōtauros, from Minos + tauros bull]



Fundamentally, the Minotaur represents the primal fear of the unknown. Fear of the unknown is deeply-seated in the human psyche. It appears to be a genetic inheritance geared to guard and preserve our tenuous survival in a potentially dangerous universe, in much the same way as our biologically-rooted "fight or flight" response. Developmentally, all infants predictably pass through a brief phase of "stranger anxiety," and children a fear of the dark, a direct manifestation of this innate dread of the unknown. While we eventually more or less outgrow this stage, learning to trust, we never completely leave behind our instinctual fear of the unknown. Anxiety is one way we adults still experience this primitive fear. Indeed, it could be argued that anxiety is the subjective experience of the threatening unknown, whether we are facing or avoiding it.

Search